Are you a sole trader or a small business leader? Pushed for time but want to grow your business? Looking for a fresh spark for you and your business?

Often it’s business leaders, the entrepreneurs and those preparing the workplace of tomorrow in our small and rural businesses that can’t find the time, motivation or funds to continue to develop their own personal skills and access training.

With 24 fully funded places on this year’s Catalyst programme available to sole traders and small business owners based in the Highlands and Islands, Perthshire and Moray, we asked David Massey, managing director at The Apprentice Store, an inspiring social enterprise company, to share his experience of the programme.

When did you take part in the Catalyst programme?

I was actually on the very first group, back in 2016, having been put in touch with Roz by the business support team at Inverness College UHI. The programme was easy to apply for and it was exactly what I was looking for. It was a space to explore and create a different mindset whilst also learning from other people in a similar position to myself.

Person with a blurred background
David Massey, ‘The Apprentice Store’ managing director

Did you have a goal in mind when you started?

Not really. I had the start of an idea for a new nameless project which I wanted to explore.

By the end of the programme, I had registered ‘The Apprentice Store’ and had crystalised a business model which is the foundation of how the business operates today.

In what way did it unlock new thinking?

‘The Apprentice Store’ operates as a social enterprise, one of only around four in the UK that I am aware off. Our social purpose is to create sustainable employment for young people who have been excluded from employment and to assist small and fragile communities to be sustainable by allowing young people to stay living and working from them.

We offer remote quality services such as IT support, web development and cyber security advice to small and micro businesses across the UK.

The programme has given me an insight into a different way of thinking. A process to thinking outside my blue square box, where I feel most comfortable. It was challenging but I recognise that I need different types of people around me to allow the organisation to flourish.

It helped me to mould the ethos of the business and how to model its services and the team whilst supporting the career development of young talent in our local communities.

What advice would you give to those considering applying?

Do it! It will make you look at yourself and the way that you think about doing things. It is different from many other programmes that tend to focus on finance, efficiency, scaling and processes. It puts people at the core of the business.

People need to be of the right mindset and that starts with the leaders. If you look after the people and break the mould in your thought process who knows what you can achieve. Insanity is to keep doing the same thing and expecting different results.

Based at the Inverness campus, Roz Thomas is an enterprise lecturer and runs the catalyst programme at CREATE, part of the university’ centre for remote and sustainable communities at Inverness College UHI. She is committed to supporting businesses and helping them to enhance their performance and skills.

Roz Thomas, enterprise lecturer

What does the Catalyst programme offer? 

It is accessible training that is tailored to suit your needs and preferences. It will help you to develop entrepreneurial skills, improve leadership practices and productivity, and analyse, develop and pilot growth plans.

The programme consists of six modules and is taught entirely online with an initial induction on how to use the online tools and resources as well as three twilight, tutor-led group sessions.

It is supported and enhanced by experienced entrepreneurs who input their own experiences that connect you to real-life situations and references, as well as enabling you to expand your existing business networks.

Is there a cost?  

We have 24 fully funded places subject to availability and eligibility. The places are available to small and medium size enterprises and sole traders that are based in the regional communities that the university serves. We cover the largest geographical area of any campus-based university or college in the UK – the Highlands and Islands, Perthshire and Moray. 

How do I get in touch to find out more?

To apply for one of the places or discuss the programme, please contact Roz Thomas at catalyst.ic@uhi.ac.uk

To find out more about support for business and employers at the University of the Highlands and Islands, visit www.uhi.ac.uk/en/business/

Catalyst is funded by the Scottish Funding Council through the University Innovation fund and administered by the University of the Highlands and Islands.

Our work to support dementia education

World Alzheimer’s Day takes place every year on 21 September. To mark this day, Dr Leah Macaden, a senior lecturer in nursing, a senior fellow of Advance HE and an expert in dementia education, provides an insight into the work of our nursing and midwifery department in enhancing dementia knowledge in healthcare practitioners.

Dr Leah Macaden

In the UK, 850,000 people (one in 14 adults over the age of 65) are estimated to be living with dementia. With future prevalence predicted to mirror global trends, dementia has been declared a global health priority by the World Health Organisation.

Deficiencies in the quality of care for people living with dementia are associated with gaps in dementia-specific knowledge amongst practitioners. This has been recognised as a key challenge throughout the UK and has intensified the need for appropriate dementia workforce development.

Our department aims to address this issue with a strategic approach to dementia education across our undergraduate, postgraduate and PhD programmes.

As a senior lecturer in nursing, I worked with colleagues from our educational development unit to develop the ‘dementia enhanced education to promote excellence’ initiative as an integral component of our three-year BSc nursing programme in 2017. The initiative is underpinned by Scottish policy and is delivered with interdisciplinary colleagues from NHS Highland, Alzheimer Scotland and Connecting Communities. Students are certified as ‘dementia friends’ in the first semester of the programme and progress through the ‘informed’, ‘skilled’ and ‘enhanced’ levels of Scotland’s promoting excellence framework for dementia training over three years.

Our MSc advanced nursing / professional practice programme includes an expert dementia practice module and we have two externally funded PhD projects focussed on dementia too. One is exploring technology enabled dementia education for remote and rural practitioners and the other is looking at the role of technology and virtual access to the outdoor environment to enhance wellbeing for people with dementia in care homes.

Supporting dementia practice in care homes

The COVID-19 crisis has had a disproportionate and devastating impact on care homes, including staff and residents living with dementia and complex care needs. Structure, routine and familiarity are vital cognitive ramps for people living with dementia to make sense of their world. It is a well-established fact that an appropriately trained workforce enhances confidence and competence, promoting positive care experiences and interactions both for staff and residents.

As a Churchill Fellow, I was keen to support dementia practice in care homes through education to meet the demands for new learning at an unprecedented pace in the constantly evolving and changing COVID-19 landscape. We secured money from the COVID-19 Action Fund to develop ‘COVID dementia education for care homes’, the first dedicated blended learning resource to promote dementia care excellence in care homes during the pandemic. The resource was developed in consultation with the Balhousie Care Group and is set to become part of the UK’s COVID-19 knowledge bank.

Twenty-seven practitioners have now completed this training and we have secured additional funding to train staff who provide home care in the community. We have received positive feedback from many stakeholders and participants:

“Dr Leah Macaden secured a grant competitively from our COVID-19 Action fund, networking with two other Churchill Fellows from the Highlands to lead ‘COVID dementia education for care homes’ in response to the immense challenges faced by care home staff during the pandemic. We were able to hear first-hand from care home staff about the transformational impact of the training, both for them, the residents they care for and their families. We consider our investment to this cause very worthwhile and believe that the partnerships that have developed as a result of the project will go from strength to strength. We look forward to following the evolution of the training beyond this crisis and seeing how it continues to strengthen the enormously important field of dementia education.”

Julia Weston, CEO of The Churchill Fellowship

“I have been involved in Leah’s unique approach to dementia nurse education since 2012, sharing my perspectives as a dementia carer. As a Churchill Fellow from the region, I jumped at the opportunity to be part of this project. The resource covers the A to Z of dementia care and, as far as I know, is the only training programme that does this. Before the pandemic it was difficult enough to get experts to our remote, rural location to train staff. Then, with the pandemic when we needed it the most, it was impossible. The fact that the training is interactive using a blended approach is a tremendous plus for organisations like ours.”

Ann Pascoe, Founder/Director: Connecting Communities, Churchill Fellow [2012], Sutherland

“The Balhousie Care Group has committed to provide a therapeutic environment for people to live and die well with dementia. This project provided a valuable opportunity during the pandemic for our social care staff in North Inch and North Grove Care Homes to access a unique blend of quality education from practice and academic experts. The resource has equipped us to continue our journey in continuous improvement for dementia care excellence in our organisation.”

Lindsay Dingwall, Clinical Care Quality Manager, Balhousie Care Group, Scotland

“Being an expert group member to develop the resource was rewarding. The pedagogical and interdisciplinary approach used to design and deliver it were unique, exceptional, innovative and pandemic friendly.”

Alka Goel, Associate Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, The Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway

“Improving care and support for people with dementia is a national priority. Working with Dr Macaden to design valuable digital resources to support dementia training in care homes during a pandemic was purposeful, rewarding and timely.”

Andrew Gibson, Educational Development Leader, University of the Highlands and Islands

To find out more about our health courses, visit http://www.uhi.ac.uk/courses

To find out more about our department of nursing and midwifery, visit www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/nursing

Why it’s vital to involve children in decision making

With the Scottish Parliament passing the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (Incorporation) (Scotland) Bill earlier this year, Ellie Moses, programme leader for our MA in children and young people’s participation and leadership, explains why it’s vital to include children and young people in decision making processes.  

The Scottish Parliament has recently voted a unanimous ‘yes’ on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (Incorporation) (Scotland) Bill, making Scotland a global frontrunner in the application of children’s rights. This Bill seeks to ensure that children and young people are given a voice, that they are provided with chances for active participation in their own society and encouraged to build resilience and leadership skills to ensure a brighter future for all.

Overall, this is a fantastic achievement for all children, young people and organisations that have been campaigning for children’s rights since the ratification of the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) by the United Kingdom in 1991.

However, we continually hear that young people are disenchanted with society, that they are not engaged, that they are unruly and hard to deal with in almost all media outlets. In short, we hear that young people are trouble! However, we do not give them the chance to be engaged, to be involved in the decision-making process, to be allowed to give their opinion on matters that affect them, so how can we expect them to be engaged in a society that effectively ‘shuts them out’?

We, as adults, make decisions for children and young people centred around their ‘best interests and welfare’, however when they reach the ‘age of majority’ we hand these decisions over to them. How can we expect young people to make these life choices without providing opportunities to develop the relevant skills and abilities to be able to make these decisions?   

Children and young people are the future generation of Scotland, therefore, allowing them to be involved, will build important proficiencies for the future, such as effective communication and presentation skills; building resilience, self-esteem, understanding and empathy; it allows children to develop negotiation and leadership skills; to feel involved in their own community and wider national forum. This will allow them to feel a sense of pride in their own abilities and ensures future engagement.  

The incorporation of the full UNCRC into Scottish legislation should be the seen as the most basic set of rights that all children should expect, not as the ‘gold standard’ that we hope to achieve. The right to live, freedom of expression, food, shelter, protection from abuse and exploitation, education and an to have an identity, are the most fundamental rights of all humans. We need to build upon these rights to ensure that all children have the resources to reach their full potential. We need to support children and young people to contribute within their local, national, and global communities.

It is anticipated that the new legislation will provide children and young people with opportunities for engagement and active participation. To move forward on this path, we need to ask children and young people how they see the new legislation being implemented so that it does not end up as a tokenistic gesture.

We need to involve children and young people in the application of children’s rights and provide them with the resources to achieve this outcome. What is the point of adopting children’s rights into legislation, without the involvement of children and young people in the implementation of this legislation? To fully achieve this we, as adults, also need to improve life chances and support children to make their own voices heard. We need to be facilitators rather than decision makers.

We have made a good start, but we need to do more. Moving forward as a nation, we need to eradicate inequality, poverty and protect all children from abuse and exploitation. Only then, will Scotland become “the best place in the world to grow up” (Scottish Government 2018).

This article first appeared in The Herald in June 2021.

A history of the University of the Highlands and Islands partnership in ten objects

To mark the University of the Highlands and Islands tenth birthday, we invited colleagues to provide an insight into some of the interesting objects which tell the story of our partnership!

1. Sir John Murray’s microscope at SAMS UHI

We believe SAMS UHI to be the oldest entity in the university partnership, having come into existence in 1884. We are also proud to have been one of the founding members of the UHI Millennium Institute.

Our prized object is a microscope once owned and used by Sir John Murray, our ‘founding father’ who is honoured by our main research building, which is named after him and where his microscope is displayed.

Sir John Murray, a member of the Canadian Scottish diaspora, returned to study in Edinburgh and is known as the ‘father of oceanography’. Sir John was a scientist on board the Challenger Expedition (1872 to 1876), the world’s first recognised marine science expedition for science’s sake, covering nearly 70,000 nautical miles. He subsequently led the production of a magnificent set of 30 volumes of reports, which we have at SAMS UHI – worthy companions to the microscope.

During the production of the reports, Sir John established an ‘office’ in Queen Street, Edinburgh, which attracted marine scientists from around the world, to analyse all the materials collected on the voyage – the start of what is now SAMS UHI. The office was soon added to by physical laboratories: firstly, a barge in Granton harbour, which was formally opened in 1884 – the date we use formally for our establishment, but which I think rather underestimates our longevity; secondly, a steam yacht for offshore work.

These were subsequently relocated to Millport on the Island of Cumbrae, where John Murray became the first Director. An impressive laboratory was subsequently built, which is still active as a Field Studies Council centre.

However, in the late 1960s it was becoming clear Millport was not an ideal location, especially with an increasing need to access deep water. A new site was sought and our current location on the Dunstaffnage Peninsula was settled on and the institute was moved in 1970, where we remain, although we continue to grow.

Throughout all this time there have been several name changes, but the core of what we do has not changed: to continue to discover and to promote outwardly our discoveries. Thus, we are very proud of the ‘golden thread’ we can see very clearly running through from our earliest days to now. And no more so than the practical reminder provided by Sir John’s microscope.

The importance of Sir John Murray’s microscope to us and we hope its value to the university partnership in celebrating its tenth birthday, is not only its direct connection with an historical founder, but also its symbol to a key activity of the university – the creation of new knowledge.

Professor Nicholas Owens, Director, SAMS UHI

2. Shetland College UHI’s Lerwick building

Shetland College UHI was first established in 1970. Our Lerwick campus was originally located on the other side of town before migrating to its current location at Gremista. Up until ten years ago, the Gremista campus consisted of two separate buildings with a road passing between them. This set up always felt a little disjointed and we struggled for adequate teaching spaces.

In 2014, our new £4.5 million extension was officially opened by the university’s chancellor, HRH The Princess Royal. The development linked the two existing buildings together to form one single, large building.

The extension created an entrance which leads directly into a library and study area and which provides easy access to the rest of the college. It also helped to expand the canteen and construction workshop areas and provided a new hospitality training kitchen as well as offices and classrooms. Existing classrooms were re-designed to allow improved layout, study spaces and art studios. 

Our new campus is a huge improvement. The development helps us to support and inspire learners, providing opportunities for students to stay in their local community to study.

Euan Robertson, Senior Lecturer in Computing, Shetland College UHI

3. Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI’s portrait of Somhairle MacGill-Eain

Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI has been very fortunate in its supporters and patrons since its foundation in 1973. None stands out so prominently as Sorley MacLean. This is sufficient reason for the college to have a portrait of him, were it not also for his stature and reputation as the most distinguished of Gaelic poets.

The full-length portrait in oils was one of a series of ‘contemporary poets’ commissioned by the National Portrait Gallery in 1990 from the artist, Peter Edwards. The artist explained his work as image rather than portrait, projecting what the poet and his poetry meant to him. This purpose was underlined in the London exhibition by each of the poets choosing a poem to accompany their portrait. Sorley MacLean chose Creagan Beaga, with its intense response to the night sounds of sea and land under moonlight. The portrait shows the poet standing on the shore at Peinchorrain in Braes with the Sound of Raasay and Glamaig in the background. In 2005, the artist presented the portrait to the Sorley MacLean Trust for display in Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI.

Somhairle MacGill-Eain was born in 1911 in Osgaig, Raasay, his culture and store of tradition coming from his family and his island community, catalysed by a finely tuned awareness of the history of Gaelic Scotland and of the political position of the Gael. His poetry is powerfully redolent of the land and seascape of Skye and Raasay. But his landscape occupied a different world from the earlier nature poets and, with its litany of placenames, transcended Romanticism in its symbolic recall.

With first-class honours in English language and literature, he embarked on a teaching career. Writing with an intensity and passion, he composed his celebrated love sequence, Dàin do Eimhir, and An Cuilithionn (‘The Cuillin’) against the backdrop of the rise of Fascism and impending world war. Having made the decision to write in Gaelic, his dedication to the language was sustained in a mood of pessimism over its survival. As late as 1974, he wrote: cha b’urrainn cor na Gàidhlig a bhith ach truagh (‘the state of Gaelic could not be anything other than wretched’).

He was witnessing initiatives such as the founding of Sabhal Mòr Ostaig though, commenting that this was ‘the beginning of a beginning compared with what ought to be’ (toiseach tòiseachaidh seach mar bu chòir). Nonetheless his support for the Gaelic college was absolute and heartfelt, as his words of hope express in a poem of commemoration.

……

luibhean ’s blàthan an rùin

mu Shabhal Ostaig, agus solas,

Deò-grèine dòchas nan Gàidheal,

mu bhallachan ùra ’s sean,

…….

the herbs and flowers of aspiration

about Sabhal Ostaig; and a light

sunbeam of the Gael’s hope,

about its old and new walls.

May good fortune and success

be with the great work of the Sabhal.

Gealach an fhàis os cionn Shlèite / A waxing moon above Sleat (1974)

Professor Uisdean Cheape, MSc Senior Lecturer / Àrd-Òraidiche Cùrsa MSc, Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI

4. IT infrastructure

The project to createour university ramped up in 1997, with £100 million funding arriving for a range of capital initiatives. Information technology was seen as the glue which would bring the partnership together. One of the first initiatives was to deploy video conferencing units to each of our academic partners, made up of very large TV screens on stands and three lines.

The first email system was called ‘First Class’ and comprised an Apple computer acting as a server connected by modems to a single computer in each site.

Over the next three years, we spent several millions to provide structured cabling, a new telephone system and equipment to allow everyone to talk and use the growing video conferencing facilities without incurring very large bills.

Having a fast connection is the most important glue for any IT system so Scottish Telecom undertook their largest infrastructure project in the north. Fibre optic cables were laid from Aberdeen to Thurso via Elgin, Inverness, Dingwall and Wick. New radio towers were built down the Great Glen to interconnect Fort William, Skye and Oban and microwave and fibre optic cables were laid to get to Stornoway. A series of towers were built to connect Orkney and Shetland and this was largely completed by 2000.

By 2001 we invested another £1 million on video conferencing kit to cope with the demand for remote learning. In 2005 we were running more video conferences than the entire higher education sector in the UK combined! We also installed a number of software systems including a common virtual learning environment, student information system and library management system. Our IT helpdesk was created to grow to support the increasing demand from staff and students.

With the growth in computing demand, we also set up our own datacentres in Inverness and Oban – later moving this to Perth. This infrastructure allowed us to have hundreds of virtual servers on just eight large servers, all backed up to Oban.

In 2009, we undertook several projects to roll out Wi-Fi everywhere together with a new local area network. We also deployed updated video conferencing kit to meet even higher demands. In 2011 we moved our email and user directory to Microsoft and in 2016 we adopted the Scottish Wide Area Network SWAN which allowed for 1GB to all the main sites and larger bandwidth to the learning centres.

Together with colleagues in partner IT teams, we have shared knowledge and developed expertise in a huge range of areas which has helped to ensure that we are ready for the next ten years as a university.

Mike MacDonald, Head of IT Services

5. The university’s coat of arms, robes and mace

Once the University of the Highlands and Islands achieved university status on 1 February 2011, the search was on for the appropriate symbols for the ceremonial trappings of that lofty status – our university badge, our robes and our mace. I was delighted to be consulted on the design of these which I feel really reflect the history, location and natural environment of the university.

For example, our badge, with its compass showing the importance of location, its books showing the importance of education, and its hazel leaves which are a symbol of wisdom for both the indigenous Celtic and Norse cultures of the Highlands and Islands, is a worthy symbol of the nature and philosophy of the university. The hazel leaves and catkins also appear on the facings of the university officers’ ceremonial robes, reflecting the great wisdom and knowledge these roles demand.

The mace is now a ceremonial artefact symbolising authority, but was originally a weapon and the bearer a kind of bodyguard at state occasions. Our mace is a wonderful example of modern silvercraft with its freeform and organic symbolism, reflecting our university of the moment. I was asked to make a choice between lime and ash for the shaft. I chose ash because it is indigenous to the Highlands and Islands, which lime is not, and also for its significance in both Celtic and Norse mythology. Like the hazel, it features in the Celtic Tree calendar. It is also a symbol of protection – Yggdrasil, the World Tree in Norse mythology which supports the entire Norse cosmos, is an ash tree. This is also the case in Gaelic tradition – three of the five legendary guardian trees of Ireland were ash. In traditional folklore, the ash tree is particularly associated with the protection and nurturing of young people.

I also thought it complemented the hazel tree, which I had suggested for the badge and robes, as symbols of wisdom and protection but also of our natural environment which defines our university too.

The mace and the robes offer protection and the accrual of wisdom as our students set along life’s path!

Professor Donna Heddle, Director of the Institute for Northern Studies

6. Highlands and Islands Students’ Association awards

The University of the Highlands and Islands was one of the first institutions in the UK to work with the Higher Education Academy and the National Union of Students to introduce student-led teaching awards. They were rolled out across our partnership in 2010, then adopted by institutions across the UK by 2012.

Run by the Highlands and Islands Students’ Association, the awards give students the opportunity to thank the academic staff, support staff and students who have inspired and supported them.The annual awards are judged by a student panel who decide the winners based on the quality (rather than quantity) of nominations received for a particular individual.

In 2010, I was delighted to receive a letter to say I’d been chosen in the ‘greatest expertise in video conference delivery’ and ‘best assessment feedback’ categories. The awards themselves (a column of glass stars balanced on top of each other) were presented to me at the autumn graduation ceremony in the not very atmospheric Clickimin Sport Centre in Lerwick.

I have to admit to being inordinately proud of my awards, particularly the one for best video conference delivery. It inspired me to publish papers about the use of video conferencing in teaching. Do take part, it made my day ten years ago.

Dr Simon Clarke, Senior Lecturer, Shetland College UHI

7. Highland Theological College UHI’s library

Highland Theological College UHI has the largest library by volume in the partnership.

Since the inception of the college in 1994, the collection has grown significantly, due in large part to many generous benefactors over the years, not least of which was the family of the late and dearly loved Martin Cameron. As librarian and a pillar of college life for some twenty years, Martin built the collection from the ground up to the 60,000 plus volumes we are privileged to be custodians of today.

The college has three main special collections. The Rutherford House Collection, comprising 11,500 books and 1800 periodicals and pamphlets, including rare and important monographs which belonged to what is now the Rutherford Centre for Reformed Theology based in Dingwall. The William Temple collection, comprising books of important Anglican heritage from the personal library of former archbishop of Canterbury William Temple (1881-1944). And the Fort Augustus collection, containing some 10,000 volumes from the former library of St. Benedict’s Abbey, a Roman Catholic Monastery from 1880 to 1998. A more detailed history of the collections held by the library is featured as part of the library’s online guide.

It’s always fascinating and exciting to come across resources which give an enriching insight into Scottish church history and we look forward to digitising this content to make it readily accessible. One such primary source held at the library is a handwritten book of some 28 sermons dating from the 18th century. It was penned by Rev Thomas Simpson of Avoch, an ancestor of a gentleman whose wife generously donated the book to the college in 2020. The postscript reads:

‘This first volume of sermons was begun at Avoch the 27th day of October 1760 years and finished the first day of October 1761 years by me Thomas Simpson minister of the Gospel at Avoch. Deo Juvante.’

Geordie Cryle, Librarian, Highland Theological College UHI

8. SAMS UHI’s Culture Collection for Algae and Protozoa

Algae are the unsung heroes of the sea, providing food for larger creatures and absorbing some of the carbon dioxide emissions from human activity.

More than 3000 different strains of algae, protozoa and seaweeds have a home at the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS) UHI, where scientists at the Culture Collection for Algae and Protozoa (CCAP) maintain a unique collection that goes back more than 100 years.

The global reputation of CCAP, which regularly sends marine and freshwater samples to researchers and companies all over the world, showcases the university’s science credentials on the world stage.

Perhaps the oldest sample in this collection is the algae Chlorella vulgaris. It was first isolated in 1892 by Dutch scientist Martinus Willem Beijerinck, who is credited with discovering viruses. This particular strain is used in ecotoxicology tests and is therefore ordered on a regular basis, as well as having citations in more than 100 academic papers.

Chlorella vulgaris was part of the original collection started by Professor Ernst Georg Pringsheim at the Botanical Institute of the German University of Prague in the 1920s. In response to the Nazi invasion of Prague, Pringsheim and his cultures moved to the UK. The collection grew and was split between marine and freshwater algae, with the marine elements coming to SAMS in 1986. However, when SAMS UHI opened the Sir John Murray Building in 2004, the freshwater collection came to Oban too, creating one of the most diverse algal collections in the world.

Euan Paterson, Communications and Media Officer, SAMS UHI

9. Cachaileith na Colaiste at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI

‘The gateway of the college’ is a symbol of the welcome experienced by students over the years on entering the enfolding arms of the old building. This is the entrance to the old steading of Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI, the building in which the Gaelic college was founded in 1973.

The iron gates were not a part of the original building, but were brought from the house of Rosemount, Tain, about 1982 and re-erected in their present position. They were dedicated by Lady Ray Bannerman in a ceremony which included unveiling a fine bronze war memorial to the fallen of the 1939-1945 War mounted on the steading wall beside the gates. This also celebrated a landmark moment for the college with validation of the first SCOTVEC further education courses.

The gates, fine products of the craft of the blacksmith (whose name is not recorded), were probably made about 1949 when An Comunn Gàidhealach set up its annual summer youth camp at Rosemount or Cnoc nan Ròs at the direction of John M Bannerman (1901-1969). Lord Bannerman of Kildonan, Liberal politician and farmer, rugby internationalist and Mòd Gold medallist, was president of An Comunn Gàidhealach from 1949 to 1954 and worked tirelessly for the promotion of Gaelic.

The gates remind us that the high art of metalworking belonged to the Gàidhealtachd of Scotland and Ireland; the same patterning and decorative flourishes are found on the earliest fine metalwork, on carving and sculpture and in the embellishment of manuscripts, and are symbolic of Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI’s role in the preservation and perpetuation of the language.

Professor Uisdean Cheape, MSc Senior Lecturer / Àrd-Òraidiche Cùrsa MSc, Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI

10. The Cairns Bowl, Orkney

In July 2018, the oldest wooden bowl found in Orkney to date and the only prehistoric wooden bowl, was found during our excavation at The Cairns in South Ronaldsay.

The 2000-year-old vessel was recovered from an underground chamber beneath the Iron Age broch that once dominated site. It is very finely carved, exceptionally finished and was carved from alder wood.

Measuring around 27 centimetres in diameter, it has an elegant profile, an everted rim (splayed outwards), a globular body and round-bottomed base. Tool marks are visible in the interior, but the exterior has been finely burnished.

On one of the broken edges of the bowl there is something astonishing. A series of about 16 strange-looking, strips of bronze can be made out. They are flush with the surface of the bowl and arranged in a tightly spaced vertical column running up the height of the vessel along the line of a large, ancient crack.

The strips are in fact an unusual and distinctive type of wood rivet. Beyond these, a further small straight metal strip, also bronze, runs across the break and is an ancient bracket or staple! The staples and rivets represent a very artful ancient repair, or repairs, made to prolong the vessel’s life. The care taken over the repair of the bowl suggests such items were not common and that it was highly valued.

It is thought the bowl was placed in the subterranean chamber – at its deepest, innermost end – sometime between AD150-200.

The bowl is currently undergoing a long process of conservation and consolidation in Edinburgh. When the process is complete, the bowl will return to Orkney and the Archaeology Institute, and thereafter, when all the field work and analysis on site is complete, it can hopefully take up a place in the museum here so locals and visitors can see this miraculous survivor from the ancient world.

The craft and cleverness that went into the bowl and the exquisite repairs show that 2000 years ago Iron Age Islanders had sophisticated and artful sets of skills.

The resilience of these communities and their willingness to sustain their possessions, and their culture more generally, is surely an inspiration for the university and its contemporary cultural, economic and environmental mission across the Highlands and Islands.

Martin Carruthers, Archaeology Lecturer, Orkney College UHI

Nursing in the Highlands and Islands: An interview with Professor Annetta Smith

To mark International Nurses Day, we caught up with Professor Annetta Smith, Head of the Department of Nursing and Midwifery, to ask her about careers in nursing, working in the Highlands and Islands and the impact of COVID-19.

Can you describe your career and how it led to your current position?

Most of my career as a nurse has been spent in education. When I was working as a nurse in clinical practice, I always had a particular interest in teaching nursing students. My first teaching post was in the Highlands and Western Isles College of Nursing and Midwifery, I spent almost 19 years working with the University of Stirling where I held various senior positions before joining the University of the Highlands and Islands as Head of Department in 2017. Alongside nurse education I have developed a number of research interests over the course of my career and completed my PhD in 2008. It has been a privilege to able to combine my two interests of nurse education and health research during my career and I was delighted to be awarded the title Professor of Nursing in 2018.

Our university partnership took over delivery of pre-registration nurse education in the region in 2017. How has the department developed since then?

There have been so many significant developments that have happened since we became an academic department in the university in 2017. We have grown quickly and diversified our activity. Our undergraduate student nurse numbers have increased significantly, we offer a successful MSc programme in advanced nursing practice / advanced professional practice and our shortened post-registration midwifery programme has helped to ensure midwives have been prepared to work in our Highland and Island communities. The number of PhD students supervised by our department continues to grow and our researchers are making an important contribution to new emerging health evidence through research grant activity, academic publications and knowledge exchange. 

What have been the highlights over the last five years for you?

It has been an incredibly exciting five years, supporting both the transition of nurse education into the university and the rapid growth of all the department teaching and research activity. The highlights are always our students. Although we could not have a physical graduation last year because of the pandemic, our first nursing, midwifery and advanced practice students graduated from the university and are now working across the Highlands and Islands, throughout the UK and beyond. From a more personal perspective, I have had the opportunity to work with colleagues both in the UK and globally across education, research and policy activities and have enjoyed the opportunities these collaborations have offered and it has been a privilege to make that wider contribution to the nursing profession.

Why is nursing a good career option?

Nursing is a varied, complex and multi-skilled profession and nurses work in many diverse settings and the career opportunities are almost endless. Nurses can be found in every health care setting, they are at the front line of care delivery, often leading and delivering specialist services. Nurses make an important contribution to service delivery in social care and third sector agencies, can work in the private sector and prison services. Nurses are healthcare management leaders, academics and researchers. There are too many career options to identify them all, but there are multiple career possibilities to suit anyone interested in becoming a nurse.

What is different about being a nurse in the Highlands and Islands?

In many respects it doesn’t matter where nurses work, the patients regardless of where they live are always the most important focus for what nurses do. Being a nurse in the Highlands and Islands gives us the opportunity to live and work in one of the most beautiful parts of the UK. Very often nurses live in the communities that they work in and that can also bring its own challenges and rewards, but the rewards will always outweigh the challenges. 

What is special about the University of the Highlands and Islands nursing courses?

All of our courses are developed in close partnership with our health service colleagues and that joint approach helps to ensure that our courses are highly relevant for our students and for their professional development and competence. We have two campus sites, in Inverness and Stornoway, our campus in Stornoway in the Western Isles is unique to the UK as it provides an opportunity for nursing students to undertake their programmes in an island setting. All of our students have the opportunity to experience such a wide diversity of placements across the Highlands and Islands, that includes opportunities for unique remote and rural experiences of healthcare.

What impact has COVID-19 had on the department over the last year?

Like many similar departments to ours across the UK, the impacts have been significant. Over the past year students have mainly been taught online and, importantly, they have made a significant contribution in their clinical practice education to the COVID effort and we are very proud of that contribution. The department staff have gone above and beyond to ensure all our courses continue to run and that students are well supported. We have learnt a lot in the process and particularly how we deliver our programmes and to make the most of the technology available to us. We have really missed our more regular face to face contact with both our students and with our department colleagues and are looking forward to resuming that contact when we are able to do so. 

As well as teaching nursing and midwifery students, the department is also involved in research. Can you tell us about some of the current projects?

Health research is an important component of what we do and it is not possible to list every project, but this is a flavour of what department staff and students are currently working on, often with other external collaborators. Staff and doctoral students continue to contribute to the global effort of the COVID-19 pandemic by exploring the impact on people’s health and healthcare to inform supportive interventions. We are conducting research on physical activity in young people, end of life care and the provision of safe medication use for older people with sensory impairment. Our research activity is impact focused and aims to contribute to knowledge that will help to improve the health and illness experience of the population.  

You will be retiring this summer. What are your hopes for the future of nursing education in the Highlands and Islands?

We know that when nurses and other healthcare workers have access to their education programmes close to home they are more likely to choose to stay in the same area to work when they qualify or are more likely to return in time. This factor is so important to the provision of healthcare delivery throughout the Highlands and Islands and to the sustainability of that delivery. Given the significant growth and achievements of the department over the past five years, I am confident that education and research activity will continue to develop and innovate, and that the department will continue to be known for its excellent provision nationally and globally whilst working closely with our local partners to support healthcare education throughout the Highlands and Islands. 

To find out more about health and wellbeing courses at the University of the Highlands and Islands, visit  www.uhi.ac.uk/en/courses

Connecting the partnership: how video conferencing shaped the University of the Highlands and Islands

As the University of the Highlands and Islands celebrates its tenth birthday, our longest serving video conferencing expert, Roray Stewart, provides an insight into the importance of the technology to the development of the partnership.  

When did you join the University of the Highlands and Islands partnership?

I started as an apprentice IT technician with Shetland College UHI in 1998, before becoming a video conference technician with the university in 2001. At the time there was an expansion of IT services taking place across the partnership. Partners could submit bids to host services. Shetland College UHI won the right to run the video conference service.

As part of my work at the college, I’d had some experience of helping staff and students use the video conference facilities. I found it interesting and could see that it had potential for becoming a more widely used technology. I worked alongside the senior video conference technician and video conference administrator.

How has your role changed over the time you have been with us?

There have been a few significant changes over the years:

  • The growth in video conferencing demand. In 2001 we ran 2200 conferences. Fast forward to 2019 and we were running 22140 conferences. For obvious reasons 2020 saw a significant growth with approximately 92,000 meetings on Webex alone. Add on Microsoft Teams and we will have hosted over 100,000 meetings!
  • The technology has moved on leaps and bounds with better quality audio and video and added features. Two of the main ones that enabled growth were desktop calling and recording of conferences.
  • We are no longer as hands on with scheduling meetings. We used to manually create each meeting the morning of the day it was due to take place.

What are some of your most memorable moments?

  • When we hit 10,000 conferences in a year in 2011. That seemed like such a milestone at the time.
  • Presenting at two online sessions which I would describe as being well outside my comfort zone. In August 2020 I ran a Webex training session to over 180 staff members. I had never presented to as many people before (or since). I also gave a presentation to the Webex community recently about the university and our transition to Webex. The live session reached 17 countries with 43 different organisations represented by 78 attendees.
  • Being lucky enough to have travelled around most of our campus locations throughout the years. The scenery is stunning and we have great staff around the partnership.

What is your proudest moment of working with the university?

Seeing university title granted and becoming the University of the Highlands and Islands. The hard work by many over the years had finally paid off.

Do you think the role of video conferencing has been vital to the development of our university partnership?

For me, it certainly has been one of the key tools in the development of the university partnership. Video conferencing has been used since the early days of getting the university off the ground, through the different phases of our development, to being awarded university title and now continuing through a global pandemic.

Due to our geographic spread, video conferencing will remain a key tool in our development going forward. It may take on a new name and the technology may change, but video will still be at the heart of it. Using a blend of face-to-face teaching and innovative technologies offers students the flexibility to study when and wherever they choose.

Do you think the university partnership is a pioneer in this area?

We were well known for being a pioneer in video conference use and our opinion was respected by other institutions, at conferences and by the equipment vendors. I remember colleagues that had attended or given presentations at conferences saying that the other attendees were always impressed by the sheer volume of video conferencing we did back then.

What do you think the future holds for video conferencing and online meetings?

Video conferencing and online meetings are here to stay – I think that’s safe to safe to say. Conferences and events will offer some form of online capability alongside in-person attendance for a while to come, although I’d expect that to reduce over time.

A couple of possible developments down the line could be 3D video conferencing or virtual reality meetings where attendees will meet in either a virtual representation of a real space or a purely virtual one. There are start-ups and companies already working on this, but whether they come to market time will tell.

For me it’s an exciting technology sector to work in and one I have a real passion for. Also, I finally no longer need to explain what my job is as everyone has been video calling or ‘Zooming’ for the last year or so!

Preparing students for the workplace of tomorrow, with the skills employers value now

As part of our annual employability week, Fergus Weir, Managing Director at teclan ltd, one of Scotland’s leading Digital Marketing Agencies, and Nicola Smith, Head of Careers and Employability at the university, share their thoughts on developing skills for a digital future.  

Reflecting on his career journey, Fergus reveals an early fascination of internet technology having witnessed the evolution of the internet from around 1992 and shares his tips on landing a right role.

Photograph of Fergus

My passion for learning and not being afraid to have a go – make mistakes and learn from them – equipped me with the confidence to explore almost all the emerging internet technologies of the time.

Fast forward a number of years and having gained much more knowledge and experience in web technologies and commerce, I still use and need these early learnt skills. As the managing director of a fast-growing business in the digital sector my ethos remains the same, it is important to find solutions to problems by learning from all experiences and to not be afraid to try

Why all graduates should consider pursuing opportunities in the digital sector

A common phrase touted around used to be ‘the future is digital’. Well, the future has arrived. Almost everything is digital. There are very few roles and jobs in today’s economy that do not involve digital skills and technologies in one form or another.

Our culture and societal norms are often embedded in digital medium.

The workplace of tomorrow needs you! Those who can add value, solve a problem, create something new or just improve how a business utilises technology. Equipped with the right skills, confidence, and qualifications you will have a powerful role to play in the way the future economy develops.

The digital sector, its growth, and the opportunities available in our region

Prior to COVID-19 the trend for businesses to expand more into internet technologies as a gateway to market had been steadily increasing. Our experience at teclan showed that businesses in the Highlands were not always at the forefront of that trend.

However, since the pandemic, many businesses across the UK, including the Highlands, have been given a sharp shock, forcing them to implement sometimes missing or old digital strategies to generate new revenue streams and routes to market.

This is resulting in a labour market change with a significant boom in the need for skills that support and assist that transition and expansion into online technologies. The continued increase in internet usage over the last 18 months, across all age groups, has further accelerated opportunities and growth for those businesses adapting to the changes and adopting new digital practices.

Another outcome from the pandemic has been the explosion of flexible working and a wider cultural shift in thinking that people can work for anyone, from anywhere. With the rise of digital agencies and businesses increasingly bringing these skills in-house, it has further increased the need for digital technology literate problem solvers who are competent and enthusiastic people.

The right fit – proactively identifying and pursuing opportunities

Working for money is an awful lot easier if you like what you do AND you work with, and for, the right people. Understanding an organisations core values and speaking with the people who work there can help hugely in determining whether you want to work there or not.

As a business leader, I know that our employees are vital to our success and I enjoy speaking with people that are truly interested about what we do and want to find out about what opportunities, work placements are available, or just want a little advice. 

Pick up the phone. Send an email. Be genuinely curious and interested in a business and its employees and owners, to get to know that business and its people. It’s part of your learning. Ask about opportunities, work placements, or just advice. Business owners will generally happily talk about their business if they feel someone is truly interested.

Working for money is an awful lot easier if you like what you do AND you work with, and for, the right people. Understanding an organisations core values and speaking with the people who work there can help hugely in determining whether you want to work there or not.

As a business leader, I know that our employees are vital to our success and I enjoy speaking with people that are truly interested about what we do and want to find out about what opportunities, work placements are available, or just want a little advice. 

Pick up the phone. Send an email. Be genuinely curious and interested in a business and its employees and owners, to get to know that business and its people. It’s part of your learning. Ask about opportunities, work placements, or just advice. Business owners will generally happily talk about their business if they feel someone is truly interested.

Fergus Weir is speaking on Tuesday 27 April 2021 as part of the University of the Highlands and Islands employability week event series.  

Based in Lochaber, Nicola comes from a long line of small business owners stretching back to her grandparents. She is passionate about helping students to prepare for their future and supporting them into future employment. 

Dial-up phones and no mobiles or emails! The changed working world

Photograph of Nicola

When I first started in the workplace, we used dial-up phones, there were no mobiles, we didn’t have email, and a fax in the workplace was very high tech.

Each new technological advance meant learning new skills, adapting practice and processes, and quite often running to catch up. Between then and now, the world of work has changed dramatically, and it keeps changing as we and the technologies we use to manage our lives grow and evolve.

Will the pandemic make changes to our working lives, and the way in which businesses approach the future?

Change inevitably results in new practices, which means new opportunities, and teclan is a perfect example of how innovative forward-thinking organisation can thrive and grow in a rural environment.  

And for our students and graduates entering the workplace, I firmly believe that the advancement of flexible working accelerated by the deployment of technology during the pandemic will result in new and attractive employment opportunities that can help people to create a healthy work and life balance from the location and community they love, and want to be based in.

What does remain constant is the type of skills and attributes that we develop in our further and higher education courses, and through the support we provide at the University of the Highland and Islands career and employability centre, all designed to ensure students are equipped with the attributes that are valued in the workplace.

Problem-solving, enthusiasm, curiosity, team working, continuous learning, being proactive, showing an interest and grasping opportunities to find solutions are vital now, and for the future workplace. 

Good communication skills are of huge importance, alongside things like self-discipline, self-motivation, and time management; not necessarily ‘learned skills’, but qualities we help our students to understand and apply.

Self-confidence in planning for the future is also key. There is widely held belief that gaining a qualification confers on you a level of instant confidence, the ability to articulate who you are as a person and what you bring to the workplace.  For some this might true, but for many it is simply the first step in working out what comes next, and indeed what the next step after that might look like. 

We all know that planning for the future can be daunting, that the next step is often balanced against other areas of an individual’s life and can and will be subject to change, and that there are a multitude of things we can never plan for. 

Our career and employability team helps students to think things through and take action to change things. Sometimes small steps, sometimes big leaps – all dependent on the individuals own unique path.

Employers will always look for a package of skills which contain these elements.  Indeed, advances in technology and a move to more remote working trends will only enhance the need for these types of attributes now and in the future 

The careers and employability centre

Our students can meet with the career and employability team anytime for a career conversation, personalised CV and application support, interview preparation and job searching. They can also access one to one support, career development workshops/events and a range of current career and employability information.

This comprehensive support doesn’t stop after graduating! Our distinctive ‘Graduate for Life’ offer includes ongoing support whenever required, long after leaving university.

Nicola Smith is Head of Careers and Employability at the University of the Highlands and Islands. To find out more information on careers support or the employability week programme of events from the 26 April to the 30 April visit www.uhi.ac.uk/en/students/careers/current-students/



How will house design respond to the ‘new normal’ after COVID?

With many employees reporting they would like to continue working from home after lockdown restrictions ease, Mike Bassett, an architectural technology lecturer at Inverness College UHI, explores how COVID-19 may change house design of the future.

Our lives have changed so much in the last year, changes which will permanently affect our approach to work. Working from home is likely to become an integral part of how many of us will spend our time, so how can we ensure that we separate our employment from our family lives?  The way we use space at home will become fundamental to remaining effective in our work and keeping a positive work/life balance.

House design must respond to the changing face of employment. A space which can be dedicated to work requires a quiet environment with natural light, heat, ventilation, high speed broadband and sufficient spatial separation so that we can focus our minds. Most of us have muddled through the current COVID crisis without many of these. The kitchen table has become the office, but with kids and dogs running around, doorbell and telephone interruptions, ad-hoc IT arrangements, these are not long-term solutions.

Most people cannot move house to solve these problems, so the solution must often be found within the existing home accommodation with minimal compromise to the domestic arrangement.

It is likely then that the architectural design and construction industry will be called upon to create innovative solutions which are constrained by the existing building fabric, space and services. The design skills of these professions must include a good understanding of how new technology can be implemented practically and cost-effectively. And building technology will continue to develop and expand in response to this demand.

This places a responsibility on the architectural profession to remain current and authoritative through education, training and continued professional development. Our architectural technology courses at Inverness College UHI provide this service, enabling students to gain their qualifications each year.

But there are other things that all of us can do ourselves to make worthwhile improvements. 

As long as an appropriate, dedicated space is available for home-working, we can improve our environment with some targeted changes. Ensuring that our home is easy and affordable to keep warm is a major factor. Adding loft insulation, draft-proofing external doors, replacing old single-glazed windows and updating to a modern efficient boiler will all make a huge difference. These changes will make your home more comfortable and provide usable working space, but will also save you money on your heating bills. There may also be financial assistance available to help cover some of the costs.

If an appropriate space cannot be found within the house, there are solutions available which can provide dedicated home office facilities in a modern, modular building located in the garden. In many cases this will provide a ‘turn-key’ ready solution and may be within ‘permitted development’ meaning that planning consent does not have to be sought.

As with any changes you make to your home, make sure you get expert advice first.

Reflecting on interdisciplinarity at the University of the Highlands and Islands

When the University of the Highlands and Islands partnership was awarded university title in 2011, Professor Meg Bateman, a writer and senior lecturer at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI, composed the celebratory poem, Let the Northern Land Shine. Ten years on, Professor Bateman, reflects on the development of the partnership and collaboration across its sites and subject areas.

Ten years ago, Alison Lochhead kindly asked me to write a poem to mark the University of the Highlands and Islands becoming a university. I was inspired. I saw our thirteen colleges like a constellation, pulling together an area that had become fragmented and demoralised by emigration, two world wars, distance from centres of power and the brain drain of its youth. 

It wasn’t always so. It appears that the wider culture of building stone circles, and thousands of years later of building brochs, was initiated in the north of Scotland and moved south. Pictish, Gaelic and Norse culture had probed the land mass and aligned peoples with various centres of power, among them Burghead in Moray, Finlaggan in Islay (and Greece in the imagination), Orkney and Shetland, the Hebrides and Man. Far from the sea being isolating, it was enabling: of trade in gold from Ireland, wine from Spain and pigments from the Middle-East and of salvation as monks sailed to islands as far as Iceland and possibly even as far as Greenland and Canada, on sea-roads later extended by the Norse. Place-names too reveal a palimpsest of linguistic, religious, fiscal and topographic connections.

How wonderful that after generations of the young being ‘educated out’, it is now possible not only for students to remain on their native turf, but for the Highlands and Islands and its populations to become the beneficiaries and frame of reference.

By some alchemy of the ancient and modern, it is remarkable in our current environmental crisis that Gaelic poetry, lore and crofting offer a useful paradigm of man’s respectful and reciprocal relationship with nature (and there is archaeological evidence of this relationship being far older than Celtic civilisation). While the poetic trope of nature’s fertility being dependent on her satisfaction with her mate might be taught at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, its practical ramifications are manifest in the research on renewables in Shetland and Orkney and on the health of the sea at SAMS. It is often along such interdisciplinary fault-lines that understanding bubbles up. 

I teach six hours of grammar a week before embarking on literature, philosophy and what-not. I undertake this attention to detail gladly: it feels like combing the hair of the language. But over and above that daily practice, I want to describe the satisfactions of interdisciplinarity in my involvement with cultural studies and the Institute for Northern Studies in Orkney College, much of it in co-operation with that powerhouse, Donna Heddle. First we wrote a course looking at the medieval literature of the Highlands and Islands in five languages (I handled one). Then she asked me to write ‘The Gaelic Legacy’, a core module for the MLitt in Highlands and Islands literature. In this, I tried to present the most interesting and salient aspects of Gaelic culture to post-graduates of other disciplines, for example, history, psychology, theology and geography.

The results were startling. An American student wrote an essay comparing Fionn mac Cumhaill and his Fenian band to a brotherhood of Vietnam war veterans, proud bikers on the edge of society. Instantly she had imbued these medieval tales and ballads with contemporary social and creative relevance. Another student looked at the archetype of the sovereignty goddess, who is both destructive and nurturing, as a precursor of the female warriors of modern animations.

The module is now taught by Iain Mac a’ Phearsain while I have a hand in supervising theses. We both feel that seeing Gaelic culture through the prism of other disciplines and vice versa has afforded us some of the deepest insights of our careers. Supervision has taken me where I would never have gone alone. My delight in selkie stories was challenged by their analysis in terms of toxic masculinity and rape apology. This year a student is showing how subjecting several Highland novels to a Jungian analysis can reveal and perhaps resolve some of our current social conflicts.  While I have been to the City of Dreadful Night with another student, I have also seen the bareness of Hoy as key to the numinous in the writing of George Mackay Brown and in Sylvia Wishart’s art.

It is a privilege to work with this institution whose backdrop is the physical beauty of the Highlands and Islands and whose work feels like a slowly opening flower – let’s say my favourite, grass of Parnassus, which grows locally in acidic soils, delicate, green-veined and honey-scented.

It is essential that we talk together more, our focus, the characteristics and inhabitants of the land, skies and waters, their ecosystems and their cultures, past, present and future.

How promising to hear our new principal Todd Walker say that Gaelic is what most excites him about coming to the University of the Highlands and Islands. Good man!

Gender equality in education: what are the challenges and how do we overcome them?

Ahead of our International Women’s Day event, we asked speakers and colleagues about their thoughts on gender equality in education.

Alex Walker, Professional Development and Recognition Lead, University of the Highlands and Islands  

The University of the Highlands and Islands is holding an International Women’s Day event to explore gender equality in education. The event will provide an opportunity to reflect on the way societal contexts and inequalities impact our student and staff groups and to identify what can be done to champion equality across our partnership.

For example, COVID-19 has impacted on all our lives, but especially on young people and on women. Those under 25 are twice as likely to work in a shut-down sector than those over 25 (Blundell et al) and women are more likely to have taken on extra caring and domestic responsibilities, with mothers spending on average two fewer hours doing paid work and two hours more on housework and childcare compared to fathers (Andrew et al).

This has particularly impacted BAME women, with a recent study finding that 45.5% said they were struggling to cope with the different demands on their time, compared to 34.6% of white women and 29.6% of white men.

There are clear implications for women staff and students working and studying at universities in this time of crisis. It’s important we reflect on the pandemic’s impact on women and how we can harness existing networks to provide spaces to share experiences around these challenges.

Ash Morgan, Highlands and Islands Students’ Association Vice President for Further Education

One of my personal bugbears in the further and higher education sectors is the lack of support and recognition offered for the extra burden placed upon people who study and additionally have caring responsibilities. This can hugely affect a person’s ability and capacity to study.

We know that caring is often a silent or hidden responsibility. It is often an unpaid position, done through love and, more often than not, falls to the women of the world. This year I wish to celebrate all women studying who have caring responsibilities on top of seeking out an education.

Tracy Kennedy, Humanities Lecturer, Inverness College UHI

There are studies showing that female academics are coping with extra pressure and sacrifice in the current pandemic. There was one female academic, for example, who asked on Twitter whether 4am to 6am was an appropriate time to be recording lectures. She is not alone. Female academics and students are often the ones home schooling or looking after very young children as well as working/studying.

In a recent class, I had an additional student (a four-month-old) who was not well and was being comforted by her mother while mum was trying to complete her work. I also teach a mum who has two lovely, lively boys, both under school age, who demand attention from their mum and have often joined in lectures! This has, of course, led to extra stress and strain as these, and all the other amazing mothers out there, try to work, study and teach their children at the same time.

Dr Natalie Jester, Lecturer in Sociology and Criminology, University of Gloucestershire

Gender-based inequality still pervades further and higher education; whilst awareness has definitely improved in the last few years, this alone will not be enough.

An important starting point is to ask who holds the (top) jobs and who gets the grant money. Rollock finds that there are only 25 Black female professors in the UK, for example. A feminist approach to education means ensuring that all marginalised groups get a seat at the table and, in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, this is arguably more important than ever because marginalised groups suffer a disproportionate burden.

Women – who often have primary responsibility for childcare – suffer disproportionately, with much less time for research (Smith and Watchorn), whilst Morgan makes the case that BAME staff (his own framing) are often more precariously employed and, as a result, more likely to lose their jobs during the pandemic.

The equalities impacts of COVID-19 are vast and still being explored. Further thought needs to go into examining this intersectionally, however, otherwise we risk shutting out people multiply marginalised by gender, ‘race’, class and/or disability.

Donna Clark, Human Resources Systems and Records Manager, University of the Highlands and Islands  

I recently saw a reference that described the past year as ‘the corona-coaster’ and that is certainly apt. It has been a relentless and dizzying rollercoaster of continuous change and adjustment amidst the full spectrum of human emotions. It has been the most challenging year of my career.

COVID has pushed the boundaries of leadership and management and highlighted how important it is to have a strong organisational structure in place. People management (also referred to as line management) can often be seen as an ‘add-on’ to someone’s role, almost an afterthought, but I believe that people management should be recognised as a job in itself. These skills help to cement the stability of an organisation and are essential at a time when many employees are feeling isolated and overwhelmed.

Training, mentoring and other forms of support can be invaluable in helping to develop those who have people management responsibilities, but perhaps we need to stop and rethink how we view people management as part of the wider organisational structure. Are we prepared to recognise it as a job in its own right and not just an ‘add-on’? COVID has provided an opportunity to push this question further up the agenda.

Keith Smyth, Professor of Pedagogy, University of the Highlands and Islands  

In advancing gender equality in education, we need to recognise the means through which the male voice has been the privileged one within the academic and related work of educational institutions. Historically this has included the technologies of printing and publishing being harnessed by male-dominated organisations, to distribute knowledge produced predominantly by males who were already in privileged positions. This links forward to the dominance of the male voice in learned societies, on journal editorial boards and within the structures and hierarchies of universities.

However, there are a number of approaches through which we can take directed action in tackling these and the myriad other ways in which women’s voices have been marginalised and underrepresented in learning and teaching, research and professional practice. Male colleagues who recognise this can have an important role to play in supporting the amplification of women’s voices in education, including through gender-balanced approaches to curriculum design, scholarship and research, and to supporting women in educational leadership.